Michigan Driver's License Point System

Traffic Tickets Can Lead to a Driver's License Suspension

Under Michigan state law, certain traffic safety offenses will result in the automatic suspension or revocation of an individual's license to drive. Perhaps the most common of these include DUI/DWI and misdemeanor convictions for leaving the scene of an accident. Most other traffic offenses, however, are assigned a specific number of points according to their severity, with more serious moving violations receiving a larger number of points than what is given for relatively minor offenses. As you accumulate more and more points on your driving record, the Michigan Secretary of State will take escalating actions against you which may culminate in a suspension of your driver's license. If you have any questions regarding the driver's license point system contact a Michigan traffic ticket attorney from our firm.

Here is a brief overview of some of the most common traffic violations and the number of points which are assigned to each:

  • Vehicular manslaughter – 6 points
  • Reckless driving – 6 points
  • Refusal to take a chemical test – 6 points
  • Operating while visibly impaired – 4 points
  • Under age 21 with any bodily alcohol content – 4 points
  • Speeding at 16 mph or more over the limit – 4 points
  • Failure to yield or show due caution for a fire truck of ambulance – 4 points
  • Careless driving – 3 points
  • Disobeying a traffic signal or stop sign – 3 points
  • Improper passing – 3 points
  • Speeding between 11 and 15 mph over the limit – 3 points
  • Speeding up to 10 miles per hour over the limit – 2 points
  • Driving with an open container of alcohol – 2 points

How many points before a driver's license suspension in Michigan?

When you have accumulated 4 points within a period of 2 years, the Secretary of State will send you a letter in the mail to advise you of the fact that you have a higher-than-average number of points on your driving record. Once you receive 8 points, you will be mailed another letter warning you of an impending suspension in the event that you continue to break the traffic laws. After accumulating 12 points, the Secretary of State will order you to report in for a driver reexamination which may include a review of your driving record, tests of your eyesight and knowledge of traffic safety, and a behind-the-wheel driving test.

Depending on the outcome of the tests and the nature of the offenses for which you were cited, you may be able to walk out without any negative consequence for your license, but more likely you will have to face a period of months or years with a restricted, suspended or revoked license. Further, you can expect to see your rates for car insurance go up dramatically, as the insurance company will view your excessive points as a sign that you are at risk of causing or being involved in an accident.

How long will traffic ticket points stay on my record?

State law does not permit the Secretary of State to prematurely remove points from a driving record, nor is it possible to have a conviction for a traffic offense set aside. As a consequence, the points for any traffic ticket conviction will remain on your record for two years from the date of the conviction. This is why it is so important to fight every single ticket you receive, rather than waiting until you get a ticket which will push you over the 12-point limit. The points from each moving violation conviction will sit on your record for two years, increasing your liability for a possible license suspension or revocation in the future. Take action now to contest your citation by hiring a Michigan traffic ticket lawyer from Freedman Law Group – contact us now for a free case evaluation and to get us started working on your defense.

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